Saturday, May 27, 2017

Buri and her beautiful Parrot


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Never Quit



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Friday, May 26, 2017

Sam Cannon`s Moving Art


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A world in which Donald Trump can't be seen or heard.


“Hear that? No Trump.”
  The New Yorker

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Tiny Trump


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Sarah's Scribbles

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Thursday, May 25, 2017

This Artist's Gorgeous Embroidery Has a Hairy Twist



Fashion model and embroidery artist Sheena Liam hand sews images of women whose hair seems to gracefully dangle from each of her 2D surfaces, Liam using black thread as a substitute for her subjects’ long locks.

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Happy Towel Day !


The most important thing that you need to remember in order to celebrate is DON’T PANIC; no matter what the day throws at you, draw comfort from the knowledge that you’re armed with your trusty towel.

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Peanuts


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Up all night

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Reine’s paradise





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House with Eleven Views


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Look up!


Ever since the invention of photography there has been a desire to capture the world from above.
The first aerial photographs were created in 1858 by “Nadar” (Gaspard-Félix Tournachon) and documented the rooflines of the French village of Petit-Bicêtre. These images were shot from a balloon tethered at a height of 80m (260ft) and were precursors to other aerial works by Nadar, including his iconic views of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris in 1868. Since these early experiments, aerial photography has evolved, always with the aim of “putting together the pieces,” of presenting all-encompassing views of the environments we inhabit, with ever increasing clarity and detail.
These vistas, all the time seeking to provide new visual perspectives, show not only the grandeur of our urban and natural habitats but also highlight our responsibility to preserve them. Aerial photography used to be expensive and exclusive. It involved having sophisticated and costly equipment and a wide range of professional skills aimed at documenting the unknown, the exotic. Today, however, the increasing democratization of image technology has opened up the sky to just about everyone. The drone photography revolution is a game changer, with an ever growing and diverse range of users now having access to this technology and the new perspectives of the world that it offers.

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Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Why Do We Want Robots to Destroy Us So Badly?


In National Geographic Channel’s new futuristic series Year Million, scientists, theorists and science fiction creators grapple with how much artificial intelligence will help—or harm—humanity in the future. AI is already beating us at our own games, and as the show notes, even substituting as hotel staff. So are our fears of irrelevancy—which are time and again revealed in scifi films—really that unfounded? Why can’t we shake our fascination with bad robot movies, even if they scare the shit out of us in real life?
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Alien: Covenant Review


Happily, compared to Prometheus, Covenant does better versions of all your favourite Alien tropes: crew bantz (“Sweet tits”, “Sugar dick”), a hazardous drop to a planet, the return of ship’s computer MOTHER, an argument over quarantine, running full-pelt down corridors, nervy bits with dripping water, eggs, Facehuggers, Chestbursters and Xenomorphs. But there are twists to the formula, too. There is a newborn alien that comes off like a malevolent Baby Groot. And we also get nifty Neomorphs, much more agile than their 1979 or 1986 counterparts, leaping about like Velociraptors when cornered by the crew.
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Relax

Marc Johns

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Cogito Ergo Sum


Incidental Comics

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Take me

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Candy by Roberto Bernardi

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Kirsten Beets




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These Amazing Maps Show How Kids See Their Place in the World


Many Roads Going From Varazdin, by Mihael Peček of Croatia, age 6.

  If you want to see the world through a child’s eyes, ask her to draw a map.
Or you could spend some time with this collection of maps from the International Cartographic Association’s (ICA) biennial children’s map competition.
 Kids between the ages of 5 and 15 from all over the world entered the 2015 contest, whose theme was “My Place in Today’s World.”
Their work is captivating.

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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Lily Brik. Murcia Street Art Project.


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